Gunshots on a Street called Democracy

cnn.com photo

This campaign statement uttered by candidate Donald Trump bragged that no matter what he did, his supporters would always stay with him. Yet some have begun to fall away.

I keep hoping Congress will get the clue and impeach this foolish-erratic-childish person. It’s obscene how Trump supporters continue to cheer his decisions–from signing Executive Orders guaranteed to reverse environmental protections for Americans, to dismantling civil rights, to appointing Cabinet Members  bent on ignoring their federal mandates, to hoarding his taxes, to including his family into powerful government positions, to disregarding the Emoluments Clause, to disrespecting the press and his inconsistent statements of support or rejection for any policy, or nation or leader.

I’m a long-time political activist and one of millions of citizens who volunteered to elect Hillary Clinton. When, on October 28 2016, FBI Director James Comey notified the Senate Judiciary Committee about emails discovered on a laptop owned by Anthony Weiner–husband to Clinton Advisor Huma Abedin–it was a punch to my gut.

Even if you liked or disliked Comey, Trump’s Tuesday, May 9, 2017 firing of him was a cold, calculated and humiliating action slapped on a dedicated public servant.

While Trump chips away at our Constitution, legislators in Washington DC prefer to protect their butts. They’ve forgotten the purpose of the elected responsibility to their constituents.

Bullets continue to spray from White House windows onto the Street Called Democracy. His greedy actions disrespect the other branches of our government–some at American tax-payer expense:

Trump’s week-end tax-payer travels to Florida or other sites disrupt citizens who live and work around his numerous cash cow properties. The funds expended could keep a small developing country out of the red.

The Secret Service  is also emptying our tax coffers for the 24-7 safety of Trump’s wife and child at his New York golden decorated Tower. Let’s keep hoping his wife and child will move into the White House this summer. They Are The First Family, They Should Be in Washington.

Then there are the tax-payer funds for the Secret Service to protect Trump’s grown children, spouses and others each time they travel to places near and far around the globe promoting Daddy or their own Trump-connected products. My eyes hurt scrolling through numbers published by media outlets.

The firing of Acting Attorney General Sally Yates along with the removal of U.S. Attorneys across America from their posts was an abhorrent action.

The recall of senior State Department staff from their international stations has created a void of Good Will.

The Wall. So obsessed is he about building this thing that would separate Americans from one of our friendliest neighbors.

Russia. Putin. Hacking. And the shills who weaseled their way into his campaign.

Be wise be woke be knowing.  If Trump’s unbalanced behavior escalates, holes could turn our Constitution into a piece of lace. Our Fourth Estate–the Media–must continue their energy to surgically remove the infection crawling inside our Democracy.

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International Women’s Day

It’s International Women’s Day. And it’s A Day Without A Woman, a Day that blossomed out of the January 21, 2017 marches that took place around the planet.  Today I won’t be buying anything and will wear red. I’m retired so am home writing this post that reviews the book– “Remembering The Ladies: From Patriots In Petticoats To Presidential Candidates”.

Amazing American Women

“Remembering The Ladies … ” by Carol Simon Levin celebrates 63 strong women who  made differences in our nation. Who, when you pick up this book, will be your favorites from these heroines? The women are featured in sections denoting their legacies.

Founding Mothers; Abolitionists and Suffragists; Advocates for Worker, Immigrants, Women’s and Civil Rights; Women who served in either the House-Senate-Supreme Court-The State Department or Tribal Government. The final section lists those pioneer-women who traveled on the bumpy Road to the White House.

In single page mini-biographies, every one of these women’s accomplishments tell how they impacted the lives of others. 35 female artists created illustrations for each  narrative. Marketed as “… a coloring book”, you’re welcome to spend leisure hours with colored pencils or crayons to satisfy your artistic delights. Each biography includes recommendations for additional reading or historical sites to visit.

As one who presents stories to audiences about slavery and the flights to freedom, my interest was reading about seven women who are featured in the section–Abolitionists and Suffragists.   Although Harriet Tubman, Lucretia Mott and Sojourner Truth were known to me, what a pleasant surprise to read about four additional women!

Phillis Wheatley 1753-1784

In 1761 when a six-year old African girl arrived in Boston on the slave ship ‘Phillis’, John Wheatley and his wife Susannah named her Phillis Wheatley.  John was a merchant, tailor and progressive thinker. He and Susannah realized that Phillis was a bright child and directed their daughter to oversee Phillis’ education. Later, their son introduced Phillis to Latin. Phillis wrote her first poem at the age of 14. At the time of her death at age 31 she became recognized as the first published African-American woman.

Sarah and Angelina Grimke were siblings–born thirteen years apart. Raised in South Carolina they soon turned to abolitionism, after moving north. They became friends with William Lloyd Garrison–Abolitionist and publisher of The Liberator. The sisters went on the speaking circuit and organized “parlor talks” for other women, one way for women to become part of a movement dominated by men. Women were not visible on the speaking circuit but these two caused a backlash each time they spoke in public. They also wrote letters to ladies in the south, imploring them to free their slaves. As suffragists they became outspoken on behalf of women’s rights. Sarah authored a declaration questioning property laws and other repressive laws that favored husbands.

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper was born free in 1825. With her ability to read and write she too was a poet, and a novelist, an abolitionist and an advocate for women’s rights. At 20 her first book of poetry was published, followed by a second book in 1854. She was outspoken about education of the “colored race.” Alongside William Still a Philadelphia abolitionist, she helped fugitive slave on the Underground Railroad that led them into Canada. Frances helped found the National Association of Colored Women in 1894, serving in that capacity until her death in 1911.

These are just bits from each of a few bios that Levin collected for this book. For teachers it’s an excellent resource for your classes. For parents I recommend this as one additional book on your children’s bedside stand for story-time.

Never during my youth were there inspirations to learn about any of the women gracing the 160 pages of Carol Simon Levin’s book. If I had one prayer to take flight on this Day Without A Woman, it would be for society to open their eyes, hearts and minds.  Women hold up half the sky, right along with Men.