Water is life

(Photos by Doreen Stratton)

The recent spate of articles featuring the shortage of fresh water and the proliferation of unpotable water recalled for me my week-long trip to Africa five years ago this February. At that time, I along with Phyllis Eckelmeyer and Alice Sparks had traveled to the Kenyan Maasai village of Olosho oibor.  As the committee for the Maasai Cultural Exchange Project (MCEP) our itinerary included a fact-finding tour of our organization’s programs. The schedule included visits to primary schools, water wells and visits with our Maasai friends. Francis ole Sakuda, a Maasai Tribal Leader and his wife Susan Naserian Nketoria hosted us in their home.

(Sakuda, the first in his village to attend college, holds an Anthropology Degree and a Masters in International Relations and Resolution. In 2018 he was appointed Kajiado County Executive Committee Member for Public Service, Administration and Citizen Participation.)

MCEP’s history with this Maasai tribe reaches back to 2003 after Eckelmeyer’s chance encounter with Sakuda on the Hamilton New Jersey Train platform. A conversation ensued and Eckelmeyer, realizing the struggle for potable water in Sakuda’s community founded MCEP. A partnership was formed with Sakuda’s NGO—Simba Maasai Outreach Organization (SIMOO) and our non-profit organization. After MCEP received a $30,000 donation, in 2005 the first well was drilled. Subsequently six more wells have been drilled across their village of 5,000 people.

Pipes traverse throughout the village carrying water to cisterns installed on individual manyattas, which is the Maasai term for property, usually encompassing a size of one acre. Piping also reaches inside three greenhouses that bring water for drip irrigation of vegetables, the staple diet in Maasai culture. School age girls, previously at home caring for younger siblings, are now attending school. Women, freed from walking miles every morning instead spend those hours perfecting their beadwork which they sell at market.

On the Sakuda manyatta, it is protected by a 20-foot tall wire fence intwined with branches from the prickly acacia tree. A 5,000-gallon polypropylene cistern sustains the family for all their water needs. One gate kept open during daytime hours is always secured at night. Inside the manyatta is a second fenced area called a Boo Oonkishu for livestock. Dogs are common fixtures in manyattas, becoming the alert system at nighttime against prowling wildlife. I remember waking from sleep one night… the dogs were furiously barking at something on the other side of the fence.

Five Nkajijik (Maasai plural for houses) are scattered around the Sakuda manyatta. Except for a Jikoni–a small building with a dirt floor where meals are cooked–all the other Nkajijik have concrete floors. During my 2009 visit I stayed in the Enkaji OOlmaasai the guest house built with cow dung and wood. In 2015 we stayed in the Enkaji oolashumpa, built with tin. The Enkaji where we ate and socialized, had three separate rooms.

The Choo–a word borrowed from the Swahili language–is the bathroom. Constructed of wood and mud it too has a concrete floor. Two drains opened in the concrete are approximately 5 inches in diameter and have been dug to a depth of ten feet. For the convenience of guests who’ve traveled from America the drain for human waste is fitted with a toilet commode cemented to the floor. The other drain takes the water emptied after personal body hygiene.

The Choo

Every morning I carried my soap, towel, wash cloth, a gallon plastic tub of warm water and a water bottle tucked under my arm to the Choo. Dipping the cloth in the warm water cleansing my body the best I could before emptying the rest down the pit drain.
At my two travels to Kenya I had witnessed women carrying the five-gallon metal jugs of water, a canvas strap stretched across their forehead that secured the jug to their back. The jugs are the same size as those plastic blue water bottles found in homes or offices.

Each time I observed women gracefully balancing these jugs I wondered if I can do the same. One afternoon sitting near the cistern while the women scrubbed their canvas shoes I asked if I could try walking with a 5-gallon jug of water strapped to my back. They filled a jug, tied the strap to my forehead and hoisted it on my back.
I could barely stand, let alone walk upright. I almost fell on my butt.

Compared to how people in developing nations around the globe subsist without potable water, my personal hygiene in Maasailand was a luxury. While the average American home uses 100 gallons of water a day, across the globe millions of people subsist on 5 gallons or less of diseased or non-potable water every day.
MCEP often speaks at public schools about the Maasai culture. No matter what the students’ grade level, it’s always a wake-up call for them every time we describe the tribe’s struggle for water.

The April 2010 National Geographic magazine published water facts. Here are some from the list:
• 2% is fresh water locked in snow and ice
• 1% is for consumption
• One out of eight people lacks access to clean water
• 46% of people on earth do not have water piped to their homes
• 3.3 million people die each year from water-related health problems
• 2 billion gallons are used each day for irrigating golf courses
• The largest water tunnel supplying New York city is 85 miles long and leaks 35 million gallons of water per day.

During our 2015 visit our friends described a rail line passenger project under construction by the Chinese government. Beginning in Nairobi, the line which travels south from Nairobi to Mombasa, was completed in June 2017. In a recent email from Francis, he reported that a Chinese project crossing through Maasailand had discovered a huge water aquifer. Francis was able to negotiate the well’s ownership to the Maasai community.

Now there are eight wells on Maasailand. MCEP’s goal has always been ten wells and we’re confident the last two will happen.

An Education Program that MCEP began with one hundred students and supported by donations in America, now remains with the final twenty-two students: ten boys and twelve girls. Twelve students are in high school; ten in elementary. Since 2015 I have been supporting Lisa Sinantei who I wrote about in a July 27, 2017 post, “Lisa’s in school!”. She is in Grade 5.

Two other Maasai young men, also receiving donations have matriculated onto higher education. This past summer a young Maasai woman graduated from university, becoming one more empowered woman prepared to lead her country toward prosperity. Educating young girls has saved them from arranged marriages, sometimes before they reach puberty; and has encouraged this patriarchal culture to follow Kenya’s law of banning FGM (Female Genital Mutilation).

President Trump’s recent edict to rollback regulations of the 1972 Clean Water Act, along with his complaints against water saving devices, brings me to paraphrase that legendary piece of dialogue from “Game of Thrones”:

You know nothing Mr. President.

Although the Maasai in Kenya continue to experience periodic droughts and threats to their pastoral culture, I witnessed why Water is Life; why Knowledge is Power; and 5,000 Maasai know many things.

Black History in Doylestown, Pennsylvania

On a summer afternoon in 1992 my niece Leigh Miller—since then dubbed our family genealogist—sat on the porch next to my father interviewing him about his Life. The tape was recorded two years before his death. I listened as his voice mingled with chirping birds and cars whizzing past on the street above.

Daddy saved pieces of paper that were road maps of his life: photographs, tax receipts, fan mail, promotions for band appearances, a journal of payments to band members, a voter registration form, his baptism certificate, letters of praise, legal documents …everything and more associated with the home where he was born and died; and where our family remains today–134 years later.

His voice filled with nostalgia as he talked about “Scar of Shame”, a 1927 silent film  that featured his band in a pivotal nightclub scene. Considered a classic, the film was produced by the Colored Players Film Corporation of Philadelphia with an entire cast of African American actors. My niece Leigh eventually tracked down the DVD a family collector’s item now on every family members’ shelf.

(Stratton Family Archives)       STILL FROM ‘SCAR OF SHAME’

Music had been part of Daddy’s studies during his education at Scotland School for Orphans of the War, a boarding school in Franklin County for children whose fathers had served and died during the Civil War or after returning home. As a Union Navy veteran, after my grandfather Joseph B. Stratton’s death in 1900, his children were eligible to attend the boarding school. My father was four months old when our grandfather died at the age of 68.

As the last born of eight siblings, after graduating in 1917 from Scotland School Daddy returned to Doylestown where he lived with his mother Lily—our grandmother, embracing the role of Stratton Family Steward. By then his seven brothers and sisters were adults, gone from home: Inez, Harold, Joseph, Grace, James, Howard, and Charles.Jps

Hoping to benefit from his love of the written word, Daddy first applied for work in Doylestown at its two newspapers: The Intelligencer told him there were “no openings”. He was then hired at the rival Doylestown Democrat but lasted only one day. In a December 10, 1992 interview by Anne Shultes published in The Intelligencer my father said,

“When I came in the next morning, the boss told me a couple of fellows on the staff objected to me being there and threatened to quit. Because of my race, you know.”

Any thread of bias that lingered after those two rejections was erased when he applied for and was hired at John Wanamaker’s Department Store in Philadelphia. Assigned to Elevator #29, Daddy boasted on the tape, “Elevator #29 was the only elevator John Wanamaker (1838-1922) would ride up to his office on the top floor”.

My father had excelled in music while at Scotland School. When John Wanamaker’s son Rodman Wanamaker (1863-1928), took over management of the store he recruited a band among the store’s employees. Daddy was familiar with the piano but when a band member handed him a soprano saxophone a new career was born. The band performed in Wanamaker’s Grand Court of Honor, at times accompanying the famous organ. Dedicated in 1911, the organ towered above the expansive marble quad. After Rodman Wanamaker’s death in 1928 the store was sold.

Prohibition had been in effect since January 17, 1919. Daddy was 26 when he started his band, performing in speakeasies around Philadelphia. He named his group, Sid Stratton’s Four Horsemen Band. The hours in those clubs usually ran from ten at night until six in the morning, with a repertoire of “oldies dance music”. It was around this time that The Colored Players Film Corporation recruited my father’s band to perform in the classic silent film, “Scar of Shame”.

Filmed at the Roadside Hotel on Broad Street, the pivotal scene with Daddy’s band happens during couples on a crowded dance floor. For several seconds viewers can see my father’s band playing their instruments. This film received positive reviews for its portrayal of the Black Experience.

A few years ago, “Scar of Shame” was presented on Turner Classic Movies Silent Film Series. Part of the review published on TMC’s website states–

“The essential crisis of The Scar of Shame is the struggle to rise above the downward pull of the “street,” and this conflict is represented quite effectively in the film’s well-orchestrated (at times overwrought) dramatics. Just as Louise was unable to escape the influence of her stepfather, Alvin finds his promising future endangered by the secret romance of his past, suggesting that every level of black society faces obstacles beyond the obvious black/white struggle.”

Among the memorabilia Daddy had saved was a packet of Fan Mail postmarked in the early months of 1930: Every Friday for an hour, WCAU Radio would broadcast Daddy’s band live from their studio. The letters are rich with praise, asking for songs that must have brought special memories to the listeners.

One of the letters came from a distinguished Doylestown resident: Mrs. Richard Watson, wife of Judge Robert Watson. She asked for 3 songs: ‘Girl of my dreams”, “The Sweetheart of Shamokin”, and “Let me call you Sweetheart”. Before the music played her requests, my father mentioned her name. She later sent him a thank you note adding that she was giving him the saxophone she had played as a little girl.

Prohibition ended in 1933 with the 21st Amendment. The reputation of Daddy’s band flourished beyond those Philadelphia venues, expanding into Doylestown and across Bucks, Delaware and Montgomery Counties. Some of the Doylestown sites that featured the band were the Turk Tavern, VFW, Doylestown Country Club, American Legion, Doylestown Armory and Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. By the 1940s into the late 1950s three continued to play with Daddy–Stephen Bullock, Jr., John Cream and Lou Stellabott.

(Stratton Family Archives)
From Left to Right, Drummer Johnny Cream, Sid Stratton, and Guitarist Lou Stellabott

 

The one image I wasn’t able to find was the tennis court on the rooftop of Wanamaker’s store. Rodman Wanamaker, an advocate for pro golf and athletics in general had ordered the court’s construction. My father was one of the employees allowed to occasionally play on the court. He described the euphoria of hitting a ball on a rooftop tennis court protected by a wire fence. That introduction to the game led him in the 1920s to construct a clay court on a vacant family parcel of land next to our house.

Our tennis court is gone, replaced with a lovely home. I often gaze where the court once was and recall how that piece of ground had reincarnated from a clay tennis court then to a grass tennis court, then a badminton court, a croquet lawn then back to a grass court.

It was for a long time, the only clay tennis court in Doylestown Borough. For multiple dozens of Summer days, feet slid across the clay surface as aces, slices, backhands, deuces or forehands lobbed back and forth over the net. Daddy also taught a lot of youngsters how to play the game. But it was the town’s lawyers and judges that relished the game, often going nose to nose or flipping coins for the thrill to play tennis on that court.

(Stratton Family Archives)
Sid Stratton on unidentified tennis court.

On Wednesday, February 26 the County Theater is showing “Scar of Shame”. It is a one-time only event and staff at the theater have been gracious to invite me, my brother Chris and sister Judith to share memories of our father before the film rolls on the screen. It starts at 7:30. Please join us.

The Investiture of a Judge

“We are not just beneficiaries of the American promise of justice for all. …,
It falls on all of us to preserve, maintain and expand that promise
for the benefit of all people…”

–From Remarks by The Honorable Judge Jordan B. Yeager after his Investiture to the Court of Common Pleas, Bucks County

It is Friday January 3, 2020 when almost 200 citizens gather to witness the swearing-in of Jordan B. Yeager, a newly-elected Judge who will sit on the Common Pleas Court in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. We are on the 4th floor in Room 410 of the Justice Center…this new building where the lives of citizens are changed for better or worse. In my May 5, 2015 post—‘The Sins Committed In The Name of Progress’ about the demolition of the 1877 Court House, I briefly mentioned the Justice Center.  On Saturday January 10, 2015 a ceremony officially opened the Justice Center, replacing the”Rotunda” and Administration building that outgrew their use.

Now sitting in this room of the Justice Center, I’m OK with Progress even though a Bucks County historical treasure was lost when that classic structure, designed by Addison Hutton was demolished.

The Clerk announces Oyez, oyez, oyez for us to stand. The Judges enter, take their seats and then President Judge Honorable Wallace H. Bateman welcomes us to the Investiture of Jordan B. Yeager. With an increased number of dockets on the Court’s calendar it was determined that three additional Judges were needed. The other two newly installed Judges were sworn in earlier that morning: Denise Bowman and Charissa Liller.

Before administration of the Oath two colleagues of Jordan Yeager recall their years of collaboration with him. First, Bucks County Commissioner Diane M. Ellis-Marseglia describes the valued counsel she received from Jordan, counsel that encouraged her to always bring people together.

Next to speak is Frank S. Guarrieri, Esq.—Managing Partner at Curtin & Heefner, LLP.  That is where Jordan spent eleven years litigating cases, some argued in front of the Pennsylvania Supreme, Commonwealth, or Superior Courts; and some in the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Third, Second, and D.C. Circuits.

Jordan’s wife–the Honorable Kathy Boockvar, Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania—administers the Oath while their daughter Collette holds the Torah  from her father’s Bar Mitzvah; and the Constitutions of the United States and Pennsylvania State. These three vital documents charted the journey that began when Judge Yeager’s descendants escaped “…religious persecution in Eastern Europe …in search of Freedom and the American promise of justice for all.”

Numerous friends and family are thanked for traveling this road with him. However, the best appreciation is saved for last: Kathy and Collette–two companions who from the beginning were always along on this journey. “Their love—and their patience with me—has sustained me more than words can express.”

Justice Center, Bucks County Pennsylvania

One final thought. When you receive that piece of mail notifying you to appear for “Jury Duty”… Do It if you can. No Excuses.

Nicknames

Let’s reach back to 2015.

That’s the time when in our nation’s history a racist fissure burst. Donald Trump rode his hotel’s escalator to the ground floor, proclaiming his candidacy for President of the United States and soon thereafter a disease of hatred spread across our land, first infecting Mexicans, then Muslims, then the disabled, then Black Americans. When I thought he couldn’t sink lower, he expressed contempt for government employees, ridiculed leaders of other countries and referred to developing nations as ‘shitholes’. It became OK to hurl words of hate at all races, religions and nationalities.

In a few instances, when referencing either logo or mascot, the 59-page PHRC Final Order used the word nickname. The word also appeared once in the December 2 Neshaminy School Board press release announcing their decision to appeal.

There’s a website listing racist terms for every ethnicity on the planet. I won’t dignify those hateful words by sharing any of them with you. I will though, after perusing the Native American data, tell you there wasn’t one nickname among the 79 racial slurs listed for Native Americans. There is nothing familiar about the racial, harmful and hateful uttering of the R word, especially when using it with the word nickname.

(Photo from International Business Times)

On the Basic Cable station Paramount, the series “Yellowstone” includes Native Americans in the cast of this drama set in present day Wyoming where tensions between the Natives and townspeople form part of the plot. One of the principle characters in the series is Monica Dutton, a Native American married to a son of the prominent ranching Dutton family.

In Episode 2 of the second season, racism of Native Americans is witnessed when Monica goes into a woman’s boutique looking at different items. The owner—a Caucasian woman—watches Monica anticipating she will shoplift an item. Yes, you guessed it. The owner accuses Monica of stealing, calls the police who order Monica through the humiliation of a body search. However, the boutique owner gets payback for her racist behavior when she learns–too late—that Monica is a Dutton.

I recommend the series to all for its portrayal of Native American culture. No mimicry of feathers, red paint, incorrect narratives or nicknames.

I flipped opened my 1987 Revised New Lexicon WEBSTERS DICTIONARY and searched the word nickname.

It’s defined as “…name by which a person is called familiarly, other than his real name.”

My December 8, 2019 post, ‘Words Matter’ noted that the Neshaminy School Board will appeal the PHRC Ruling. I am hopeful that supporters for Donna will continue the struggle to erase the R word from Neshaminy High School… and ultimately everywhere else it wrongfully appears.

Words matter

Were you there on the night of December 17, 2019? If so, you were one of over 500 voices of The People. We gathered in the parking lot next to the Langhorne building of the office of Pennsylvania 1st District Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick.

Doreen Stratton photo

It was damp and rainy  and chilly as citizens gathered to demand the Congressman— he who “… shall be bound by Oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution, …” –is on record to VOTE NO to impeach.

On the same parking lot west of where we were gathered, there was less than a hundred Lost Boys of Trumpland, shouting the propaganda of their ‘dear leader’.

The Congressional office allowed only 7 citizens at a time to be hustled up to the 4th floor to his District Office (paid for by the way with our tax dollars). We were permitted to express our position  about the impending Impeachment vote on a one page form where we included our contact information. His staff also distributed a 2-sided one page statement from the Congressman explaining why he will vote against impeachment.

Oh by the way, today was the Congressman’s birthday. A cake was in the reception area for any of us who wanted a slice. I declined.

When our group left the building there was a middle-aged male standing on the outside steps. He asked me who I was and I said my first name; and he asked why was I there and I answered that I wanted to tell Fitzy I supported Impeachment. This guy possibly was one of thousands of people who–in the 2016 election–stepped inside a voting booth for the first time in their lives. He puffed up his chest, glared at me and said: “Trump 2020! Screw you!”

I walked away.

As for Fitzy’s letter, here’s an excerpt from the last paragraph on the back page—the only words Dear Reader, worthy to share:

“Each and every one of us has a responsibility to hold ourselves to this high standard. The future of our democracy, and the future of our nation, depends on it.”

What’s up with that lower case D for Democracy? Really?

If you want to vent after reading the full text, call  Will Kiley in the Congressman’s Washington DC office: 202.225.4276. Phones seem to be their penultimate form of constituent communication.

Finally I must send Kudos to the area activists from Move-On, Indivisible and all the other organizations for organizing this event. Well done.

There were so many signs, not able to get all of them. Go to Facebook pages for Doylestown Democrats and Rise Up Doylestown to view all posters.

Doreen Stratton photo

Feathers, Red Paint and the R Word

On January 2 of this year I posted a blog (“The R Word”) about a hearing called by the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC). The hearing was held at Bucks County Community College to take testimony from witnesses on behalf of the Neshaminy School Board in defense of their high school’s mascot: A Native American symbolically called  ‘Redskins’. Testifying against the mascot was Donna Fann-Boyle of Cherokee-Choctaw heritage whose children attended the School. In 2013 she initially had complained to the school about the racist symbolism of the mascot.

At the heart of this complaint is the word redskins which American history first uttered from the tongues of our country’s forefathers in 1755. This racist term referred to the horrific condition of human tissue exposed after the hair was ripped from the skulls of our original Americans.

The PHRC announced they would issue a final ruling of this struggle on Monday November 25, 2019.

That morning I hitched a ride along with Donna, her film documentarian Chris, Child Educator Lynne Azarchi, Native Chilean Mabel Negrete and Lenape Native Ann Mongillo Remy.

Standing left to right, Lynne Azarchi and Don Gallagher. Seated left to right Mabel Negrete, Ann Mongillo Remy, Donna Fann-Boyle and Ramona Ioronhiaa Woods.

At Harrisburg we were joined in the Commission’s expansive hearing room with a few more supporters including activists Don Gallagher, Arla Patch and Mohawk Native Ramona Ioronhiaa Woods. I scanned the room but could not see any one in support of the Neshaminy High School or the School Board.

PHRC Chair Joel Bolstein briefly reviewed the case history before announcing the FINAL ORDER. His review included Donna Fann-Boyle’s long journey of complaints to the high school and her testimonies at numerous School Board meetings. He then summarized the six Orders the school must comply with.

(Note: The 59-page document is published on PHRC’s website. The list of six Final Orders begins on page 57.)

When Chairman Bolstein read portions from each of the Orders, we felt the air suck out of the room.

ORDER 1 in Part reads: “… within 90 days the District shall cease and desist from the use of any and all logos and imagery in the Neshaminy High School that negatively stereotypes Native Americans.”

ORDER #2 in Whole reads: “That, at this time, the use of the term Redskins shall be permitted so long as the requisite educational information is provided to District students to ensure that students do not form the idea that it is acceptable to stereotype any group. The educational requirement shall continue as long as the District continues the use of the term Redskins. If, at any time, the District elects to discontinue the use of the term Redskins, the requisite educational information must still be provided to District students for a period to two years.”

The education component in the Final Order is extensive.

Chairman Bolstein also stated that because no Native American student or students came forward to say they were harmed by the word or logo or imagery, “… that portion of the PHRC Complaint should be dismissed.”

The word Redskins is allowed to remain.

After completing his presentation we were given the opportunity to speak. Visibly disturbed that the R Word would remain, Donna rose first. She expressed disappointment that the Commission dismissed the portion of the complaint that no evidence was presented that a “… Native American student or students were harmed by the use of the word Redskin.” She had decided her son would not speak at School Board meetings in order to protect him from student harassment. She has since the first filing of this complaint, been the target of cyber-bullying.  She then read a letter from tribal leaders expressing the harm that word dredges throughout Native American Nations.

I could hear Ann quietly weeping.  Ann had attended schools in Neshaminy School District. She spoke after Donna, recalling how her grandfather had visited elementary classes and described the Lenape culture to students. Ann said that after she entered middle and senior high school, she reiterated how she was often ridiculed, to the point that she’s never attended her high school reunions.

Ramona expressed the power of Native American culture. Speaking directly to the few Commission members of color, she asked, “How could you consider voting in favor of this?”

Lynn Azarchi, Executive Director of KIDSBRIDGE is responsible for programs of bullying prevention, social emotional skills and diversity education. She commented on the challenges Neshaminy High School will be tasked with in order to abide by PHRC’s ruling .

To the Commission I recalled my reaction when attending the January 2019 hearing where school supporters admitted under oath they did not know the origins of the word. ‘Redskin’: Its origins reach back to 1755 when Massachusetts Lt. Governor Spencer Phips proclaimed that payment would be given for Indian scalps.

“Forty pounds for every male Penobscot Indian scalp above the age of twelve years as “evidence of their being killed. Bounty for females: “twenty-five pounds”.

I commented how the bounty on Native Americans was just like the bounty on fugitive slaves who when captured were hung or mutilated or burned to ashes. I recalled for them that no witnesses for the school board knew the origin of the R word.

On Monday December 2, The Neshaminy School Board announced in a press release that they would appeal the PHRC ruling. Watch for my second post about thoughts on this struggle. The Court that will hear the appeal is the Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg.

The struggle continues.

49 NEW AMERICANS

During this July there were venues across our Nation—often court rooms—that scheduled Naturalization ceremonies for immigrants becoming American citizens. If you are able, I recommend you attend one of these impressive ceremonies whenever  it is scheduled in your community. These events are free and the public is always welcomed.

As an example:  Every 4th of July a Naturalization Ceremony is held in Philadelphia at the National Constitution Center.

Back in June 2016 I traveled to the Lancaster County Court House to attend the Naturalization ceremony of a Maasai friend. In July of that same year I attended a Naturalization ceremony at Pennsbury Manor–the historic home of William Penn, the founder of our state. This past Thursday July 18, I attended my third Naturalization ceremony, again at Pennsbury Manor. There were 49 men and women from 21 different countries who raised their hands and repeated the Oath of Allegiance that reads in part…

“… renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereign of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America …”

Standing to repeat The Oath

After the Oath is taken, as each name of the new American was called, they came forward to receive their official documents confirming their Citizenship in our country. Some paused as friends or family snapped their picture; many of them grinned or hugged their documents when returning to their seats. At the end of this ceremony, Austin DuSuk Yang, an American citizen formerly of South Korea described what America means to him.

For nearly two years there has been a hateful climate blowing across America. The Diversity of America was again reflected through these 49 new Americans who had abandoned their homelands in return for seeking joy, freedom, safety and success in our country.

Please Welcome our Newest Citizens who journeyed here from:

Afghanistan; Albania; Armenia; Belarus; Columbia; Ghana; India; Indonesia; Latvia; Liberia; Mexico; Poland; Romania; Russia; South Africa; South Korea; St. Vincent; Sri Lanka; Sweden; Ukraine; and Vietnam.

Disregard the noise spewing from ignorant mouths of those shouting that we “go back” to wherever we came from.  We are NOT going back.

49 Refugees on the Path toward American Citizenship

The R Word

Redesigned Logo for Neshaminy High School

For three days during the week of January 14, I attended a public hearing held at Bucks Community College in Newtown. The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC) scheduled the hearing to take testimony regarding “Redskins”–the symbol for activities at Neshaminy High School in Langhorne. Donna Fann-Boyle of Cherokee ancestry had been attending Neshaminy School Board meetings since 2012 asking removal of the “offensive R word image”. Her son attended the school. The symbol was emblazoned on uniforms, souvenirs and displayed at the school’s sanctioned events. After her son graduated, Fann-Boyle continued her appearances in front of the board, always pleading for the high school to drop the R word. It was an offensive term to Native Americans, conjuring images of the blood exposed after a scalping.

BACKGROUND ABOUT THIS COMPLAINT

Previously PHRC had ruled twice in favor of Donna Fann-Boyle, stating that the use of the R word for its sports teams and mascot was “racially derogatory”, creating “a hostile educational environment.” PHRC ordered the school to stop using the term and replace it with a “suitable, non-discriminatory…” name and mascot for its schools. After the School Board appealed this second ruling, the PHRC scheduled this hearing to include a judge and witnesses for each side.

THE SCHOOL SUPPORTERS

The expert witness for the School Board was Andre Billeaudeaux. He testified to the “culture” surrounding the R word. Billeaudeaux explained that Natives smearing red paint and red clay on their bodies as part of ceremonial rituals. His website includes information of his two published works: How the redskins got their name, about two preteens discovering how sports teams received their names; and The Real Lancaster Legend, about a high school in New York whose School Board ruled that the Native symbol should be replaced with a suitable mascot. Both of Billeaudeaux’s books attempt to justify the R word is established Native American culture.

Billeaudeaux is a retired veteran, a military journalist, television show host and magazine editor. He testified about his current focus on history and traditions of Native Americans through promoting the R Word at schools from primary through college levels. He testified that the R word holds “no racial offense” for sports teams or as “mascots” for those same institutions. He promotes this message at schools across America where Native symbols are under challenge by tribal members for their racially offensive imagery. He is associated with a 501(c)(3) organization called NAGA (National American Guardian Association). NAGA’s facebook page is filled with posts from friends devoted to Native American logos attached to sports teams.

This hearing heard testimony from other school board witnesses: teachers, students, parents and a school board member. Each stated the term was not offensive. Instead they considered the word brought “pride and honor” to the schools. When attorneys for PHRC asked each of them if they knew the meaning of “Redskin”, all knew of the dictionary’s definition: A racist term.

I was unable to attend the hearing the day testimony was heard from the expert witness for Fann-Boyle: Dr. Ellen J. Staurowsky–Program Director of Athletic Administration at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. The LeBow College website states Dr. Staurowsky to be–

  “…internationally recognized as an expert on social justice issues in sport which include gender equity and Title IX, pay equity and equal employment opportunity, college athletes’ rights and the exploitation of college athletes, the faculty role in reforming college sport, representation of women in sport media, and the misappropriation of American Indian imagery in sport.”

TESTIMONY OF DONNA FANN-BOYLE

Donna Fann-Boyle testifying on Thursday January 17

Donna Fann-Boyle’s deceased father was of Cherokee heritage from Oklahoma. For the past 31 years Fann-Boyle has made Bucks County her home. She has two grown sons, aged 37 and 20. When she moved into the Neshaminy School District it was her second son’s first year in high school. In her testimony she described her son’s distress from the continuing exposure to an image that offended him. Fann-Boyle had complained to the Assistant Principal and counselor, explaining the historic racism of the R word. After no action was taken by the school’s administration, starting in 2012 she began attending Neshaminy School Board meetings. She testified that over the years she spoke in front of the Board an “estimated 14 times”.
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She reiterated the abundance of research material she had submitted to Board members and school staff, often emailing them information with links. Some of that information was published by Native educators about bounties placed on Natives; archeological studies; suicide in Native children; and the proliferation of incorrect history about Native Nation cultures. Fann-Boyle described her annoyance when seeing students dressed in headdresses–not a signature garb for the Lenni-Lenape tribe that inhabited this part of Bucks County.

Fann-Boyle described the pain she experienced seeing Neshaminy High School students smeared with red paint on their faces and their bodies. It reminded her of the oral histories she heard when a young girl.

(Neshaminy High School Archive)

MY THOUGHTS

The lessons I had been taught in elementary and high school  stated that only “Indians” committed those horrific deeds. To be clear: Scalping was not confined to one culture.

Scalping has been documented in Europe as far back as the 11th Century. The Spanish Conquistadors landed in South America and destroyed advanced civilizations as they scalped their way north to what is now America .

Did Native cultures witness scalping and mimic it for their own purposes? Probably.

Historians record scalping by settlers in early America, usually for genocide or bounty. In 1755 Governor Spencer Phips the Lt. Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, proclaimed bounty to citizens for each scalp taken from Penobscot Nation people. The Phips Proclamation  paid forty pounds for each male scalp taken from Natives over the age of 12; and twenty-five pounds for each female scalp.

My racial mix is African, European and Native. When I read about the bounties placed on the Penobscot tribe, it reminded me of the bounties placed on runaway slaves in the 1600s when they were hung and/or mutilated.

Supporters of the mascot at the hearing overwhelmingly testified their loyalty. To them, an expression of “honor”. Not one supporter admitted knowing the Phips Proclamation’s history. They insisted there was nothing wrong when students painted red on their bodies and faces,  wrapped a band of feathers around their head then jumped and hooted for their teams.

But this is playacting and is disrespectful. It’s as if students painted their faces black with a thick white outline for lips then strutted across a stage to music.  At the hearing support witnesses continued to slide “Redskins” off their tongues  even though “Skins” now appears on the school’s paraphernalia. Below is an image of the former logo.

Neshaminy High School Football shirt 

PHRC is expected to publish their ruling sometime in July. I am rooting for removal of everything associated with the R word.

 

 

The bleaching of America

America is in “Distress”

My images from June 30, 2018 Rise Up Doylestown Rally for Immigration Reform held at Bucks County Court House in Doylestown PA

On every Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day and Veterans Day, my father displayed the American flag from the second floor window of our home. He was too young for WWI and too old for WWII. Daddy kept the home fires burning while two of his brothers raised their hands to wear the Army uniform in the “War to end all wars”. By flying the flag on those four commemorative days, he honored his brothers and his father, a Civil War veteran who died when Daddy was barely 3 months old.

The pole with its attached American flag is stored in a corner of my bedroom. I grab the pole and spread the flag across my bed, pleased the three colors remain as strong as the day it arrived in my mailbox—a Thank You for supporting programs of the USO. But this July 4 is different. How can I continue this ritual originated by my father? Will communities across America rise up to protect our Democracy?

This outrage throughout the Nation escalates every time I hear the president bombarding Americans with his offensive lies; and every time my elected Senators and Representatives disregard the oaths they swore to uphold; and every time Cabinet appointees dismantle regulations of health, safety and the environment placed to protect Americans; and every time individual rights of citizens are repeatedly suppressed; and every time instances of racial or ethnic bigotry triggers violence directed toward other citizens, and finally every time the president attempts to destroy the Free Press with his targeted propaganda.

The warning from Martin Niemollar 1892 – 1984

July opened with a mammoth increase in the Trump administration’s zero tolerance policy,  first announced in April by Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions. Following the AG’s order, the U.S. Border Patrol– affiliated with the Department of Homeland Security–stepped up its aggressive separation of children from parents or their adult relatives. What began in 2017 as open animosity toward Blacks and Muslims has now spread to the Latino community. What group of Americans will be targeted next because they “infest” America?

Instead of mounting the USO flag on the pole, it will be replaced with the flag that covered the coffin of our Uncle Charles—one of the two brothers who served in the Army. History has chronicled the uncivilized treatment of Blacks who wore Army uniforms during WWI. My uncle served a mere 41 days before his discharge a month after the November 11, 1918 armistice ended the war. Hospitalized some months later he ultimately was transferred to a VA Hospital where he remained until his death in 1965. I’ve often wondered: What happened during that blip of days my uncle served before his discharge? What cause or causes led to his eventual 25-year confinement inside a VA hospital?

Just some of the questions rolling around my mind. After digging through our family history I hope to share my results in a future post on The Bucks Underground Railroad. For now, America is in Distress and my uncle’s American flag  will be mounted on the pole. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Backward.

” … Human Potential’

A dear friend of mine– departed since 1995–was committed to helping youth-at-risk. His mantra was:

Mining the greatest resource of all–Human Potential

On this Mother’s Day, I celebrate Mothers who’ve birthed wonderful boys and girls into this World. Many of us have nurtured them so that today they hold deep respect for the humanity of men and women. Many of us (men & women alike) already realize that women bring a unique perspective when included in an arena where there is either a table or meeting or a class room or a boardroom or an elected office. After all, we honed our skills on playgrounds across America. Now we’re prepared to take them beyond here in Pennsylvania on Tuesday May 15. Hundreds of women have declared their candidacy for election to local, state or federal offices.

I am a fierce advocate for those women–98 years ago–who protested that women be granted the Right To Vote. Every time I’ve read or watched media coverage with women who’ve no clue about the sacrifices ours and their sister ancestors endured  to give us the vote apparently never watched the film “Iron Jawed Angels”. This 2004 HBO docudrama  is a strong reminder of the sacrifices experienced by women protesters jailed and force-fed when they went on a hunger strike.

It’s time to Bring Balance into this discussion. Across our Nation there are exceptional women who have announced to their families, neighbors, friends, communities and constituents that they are committed to Bring the Voice.

Alice Paul: Jan 11, 1885 – July 9, 1977

2020 will mark the one hundredth anniversary when women were granted the Right to Vote. Across the Delaware River from Bucks County is Paulsdale, New Jersey. It is the home of Alice Paul. Raised a Quaker, Paul was one of the women who struggled to bring forth the Amendment that allowed women the Right to Vote. Alice Paul was also instrumental in crafting the Equal Rights Amendment–which as of 2017, includes only 37 states to have ratified the U.S. Constitution bringing Equity to All women. Get in your car, take a group of Moms and children across the bridge and visit Alice Paul’s home.

On this Mother’s Day, my prayer is for every citizen to realize another of our Greatest Resource:   Women Citizens: Rise Up.